11 million installations can't be wrong

MySQL Journal

Subscribe to MySQL Journal: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get MySQL Journal: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories

Download Slide Deck: ▸ Here Download Slide Deck: ▸ Here A Tour of Data Platforms as a Service With the proliferation of both SQL and NoSQL databases, organizations can now target specific fit-for-purpose database tools for their different application needs regarding scalability, ease of use, ACID support, etc. Platform as a Service offerings make this even easier now, enabling developers to roll out their own database infrastructure in minutes with minimal management overhead. However, this same amount of flexibility also comes with the challenges of picking the right tool, on the right provider and with the proper expectations. Download Slide Deck: ▸ Here In his session at 18th Cloud Expo,Christo Kutrovsky , Principal Consultant at Pythian, compared the NoSQL and SQL offerings from AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud, their similarities, differences and use ca... (more)

Migrating Your Database to the Cloud? | @CloudExpo #API #Cloud

Migrating Your Database to the Cloud? Look Beyond MySQL Companies are migrating infrastructure to the cloud in order to achieve advantages and agility that they need to remain competitive. However, they may have difficulty achieving one extremely important benefit of cloud computing as they attempt to run their MySQL databases in the cloud - scalability in true utility fashion. Similar to the power utilities we are all familiar with, this entails the ability to get what you need, when you need it and pay for only what you use, even during peak demand. Why switch to the cloud if databases like MySQL limit scalability and performance? It's very simple: the advantages of shedding the headaches of managing one's own machines and reducing operating and capital expenditures are still too great to ignore. However, organizations are in many cases shortchanging themselves by... (more)

Book Review: Expert T-SQL Window Functions in SQL Server | @CloudExpo #API #Cloud #TSQL #SQLServer

There is an old saying that good things come in small packages. This saying definitely applies to this book, which focuses in on a set of functions that most people are not aware of that are available in SQL Server. To start off with we need to answer the following question: What are T-SQL Window functions? These functions have nothing to do with the Microsoft Windows API. They are in essence a way to create a window into your data as you process each line in a query. Their strength lies in the ease with which you can solve tricky queries. The authors also point out that these functions don't add any new functionality per se as you could create the queries the old way; however, in general the functions are much more efficient. One very neat capability of these functions is to allow you to include non-aggregated columns in an aggregated query, which is a big limitatio... (more)

The i-Technology Right Stuff

Related Links: Wanted: 19 More of the Top Software People in the World Sung and Unsung i-Technology Heroes Who's Missing from SYS-CON's i-Technology Top Twenty?" Our search for the Twenty Top Software People in the World is nearing completion. In the SYS-CON tradition of empowering readers, we are leaving the final "cut" to you, so here are the top 40 nominations in alphabetical order. Our aim this time round is to whittle this 40 down to our final twenty, not (yet) to arrange those twenty in any order of preference. All you need to do to vote is to go to the Further Details page of any nominee you'd like to see end up in the top half of the poll when we close voting on Christmas Eve, December 24, and cast your vote or votes. To access the Further Details of each nominee just click on their name. Happy voting!   In alphabetical order the nominees are:   Tim Berner... (more)

Dynatrace makes life easy for OpenStack admins (EAP starting)

We’re thrilled to announce the Early Access Program for Dynatrace OpenStack integration! This blog post is the first in a two-part series that explores how Dynatrace supports the monitoring of OpenStack environments. OpenStack has become quite popular in recent years. Organizations are increasingly opting to build public and private OpenStack cloud environments for their employees and customers. One reason for the rapid adoption of OpenStack is its vibrant user community, which has fueled OpenStack’s growth and spirit of innovation. By joining the OpenStack community you can contribute your ideas related to requirements definition as well as development. This gives you the power to actively shape the features of the next OpenStack release. OpenStack is indeed powerful, but it’s also complex. As an OpenStack admin, you know perfectly well that there’s no such thing a... (more)

Tutorial: Deploy a Highly Available WordPress Instance as a StatefulSet in Kubernetes 1.5

At The New Stack, we covered various strategies for running stateful workloads on the Kubernetes container orchestration engine. This article takes a practical, hands-on approach to deploying a highly available WordPress application in Kubernetes based on the strategies and best practices that were discussed earlier. We will cover everything from setting up the Kubernetes cluster to configuring shared storage to deploying the stateful application to configuring auto scaling of the application. Deploying and managing traditional workloads such as databases and content management systems in a containerized environment calls for a different approach. While it may be easy to package, deploy, manage, and scale contemporary, cloud native applications in Kubernetes, managing a MySQL cluster or a fleet of WordPress containers requires an understanding of how storage, netwo... (more)

EOS Editorial — The Parable of the Innovator and the Purple Cow

Blogs are a great platform for people to espouse their passions (not unlike editorials). They are different than traditional news outlets because they may be objective, opinionated, and even wrong. Interestingly enough, each of these behaviors is frequently rewarded equally. I was reading a blog not long ago in which an executive of an open source company was ranting about how he didn't want to be grouped in with other open source companies that were exploiting the cost advantage of open source. He raised the point that he was there to make excellent software and didn't want any part of the low end of the market. He even invoked the tired argument that comes from ultraconservative critics of open source, "If it's inexpensive, it must just be a cheap knock-off of commercial software." To tell the truth, it was a little shocking. You see open source is about both bet... (more)

From the SYS-CON Archives: Sun Buys MySQL, Gets Oracle for an Enemy

Sun, Oracle’s sometimes best friend, turned into an Oracle competitor this morning when it said it was buying MySQL, the open source database that’s part of the famous LAMP stack. It’s paying a billion dollars. MySQL was supposed to go public this year but picked the easier monetization route. Sanford C. Bernstein estimates MySQL’s financial position at breakeven on $60 million-$80 million on trailing 12-month revenues although over 100 million copies of the database have been downloaded. Sun is paying $800 million cash for MySQL’s stock and assuming about $200 million in options. But Sun has been known to overpay for acquisitions before. Remember its fatal $2 billion Cobalt Networks deal? Sun, which is given to highfalutin rhetoric, sees its acquisition of MySQL as reaffirming its position “at the center of the web economy” and its role as “the largest commercial o... (more)

Amazon Backs Cloud Server Start-up Elastra

Elastra, a 40-customer SMB-directed start-up that provides a legacy-embracing configuration management service for Amazon Web Services (AWS) - your basic in-a-click virtual deployment, monitoring and accounting beginning with RDBMSes like MySQL, Postgres and EnterpriseDB - has picked up a $12 million second round from - surprise, surprise - Amazon, Bay Partners and existing investor Hummer Winblad. Maybe the investment will convince Elastra not to go cloud-agnostic/anti-cloud silo like it plans - unless it becomes a cloud standard. It uses two homegrown markup languages (no scripting here) to get to the cloud. (The stuff of standards?) Amazon also has money in Ruby-on-Rails cloud play Engine Yard, part of the $15 million the start-up raised last month. Elastra, run by former Plumtree CEO Kirill Sheynkman (pictured), took in a $2.6 first round last year to create m... (more)

Oracle’s Summit with EC Apparently Fails

Oracle co-president Safra Catz met with the European Commission’s antitrust boss Neelie Kroes to try to negotiate Oracle’s way out from under the EC’s investigation into the anti-competitive issues of Oracle acquiring the European-created open source database MySQL if it takes over Sun. Apparently she failed. “Kroes expressed her disappointment that Oracle failed to produce, despite repeated requests, either hard evidence that there were no competition problems or a proposal for a remedy to the competition concerns identified by the commission,” EC spokesman Jonathan Todd said Wednesday according to Bloomberg. “Kroes reiterated to Catz the commission’s willingness to move quickly towards a decision but underlined that a rapid solution lies in Oracle’s hands.” “Either they have to give us the information to prove that our competition concerns are not well founded or... (more)

Oracle Spooks Slice of MySQL Market: 451 Poll

MySQL Journal on Ulitzer Oracle's ownership of MySQL could run off some open source and MySQL users according to a poll the 451 Group took among its CAOS user community, CAOS standing for Commercial Adoption of Open Source. There were 347 respondents, the researcher says, and from their answers it calculates that: The use of MySQL will drop from 82.1% to 78.7% in 2011 and 72.3% 2014. An Oracle acquisition could run off 15% of all open source users and 14.4% of current MySQL users. At least they told 451 that they would be less likely to use MySQL if Oracle acquires it. Of course that has probably been said by users of every company Oracle has ever acquired. On the other hand, 6.3% of all open source users and 5.6% of MySQL users are more likely to use MySQL if it's acquired by Oracle. Use of MariaDB, the Monty Widenius fork that the European Commission appears to be... (more)